Tanzania - Olduvai Gorge






Overview

The transition from the earliest human culture, the Oldowan, to the more sophisticated Acheulean, is one of the most significant events in the evolution of human technology. Despite the importance of this technological transition, little is known about the biological and cultural evolutionary mechanisms underlying it.  Traditionally, this major cultural shift has been linked with the emergence of Homo erectus, a species defined by its much larger brain and body size, while the transformation from Oldowan simple core-and-flake technology to Acheulean handaxes was viewed as a steady progression rather than a revolutionary change.  However, these assumptions are not grounded in the current available evidence, but rooted in cultural-history paradigms that are only now being tested. The Olduvai Gorge Archaeology Field School will collect fresh data on the emergence of the Acheulean at Olduvai and contribute to ongoing research being conducted by an international multidisciplinary team of researchers, the Olduvai Geochronology and Archaeology Project (OGAP)

Tanzania Olduvai Gorge Archaeology Field School - Institute for Field Research Field Schools Tanzania - Olduvai Gorge18-352014-06-20
Course Dates: Jul 09 - Aug 13 2014
Enrollment Status: CLOSED 
Total Cost: $ 6,865 
Course Type: Field Archaeology
Instructors: Dr. Ignacio de la Torre, Dr. Michael Pante

Syllabus 



Instructors

Ignacio de la Torre

Dr. Ignacio de la Torre

Dr. de la Torre (i.torre@ucl.ac.uk) is a Reader in the Archaeology of Human Evolution at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.  For more information, click here.
Michael Pante

Dr. Michael Pante

Dr. Pante is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Colorado State University Reader in the Archaeology of Human Evolution at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.  For more information, click here

Testimonials

"I highly recommend this field school for anyone who is seriously considering a career in the fields of archaeology or paleoanthropology. I learned so many things that I expected to learn such as excavation techniques, laboratory procedures, and specific information about the paleoanthropology of Olduvai Gorge. In addition, I also learned so many unexpected things like animal behavior utilization in paleoanthropology, how researchers from so many different fields integrate their research, and in-depth analysis of lithics and faunal remains. Along with archaeological and paleoanthropological research, I also gained knowledge in other areas including geology, paleoecology, and paleontology, which gave me the opportunity to make professional connections with researchers from a variety of fields. This field school experience helped me in so many ways, both personally and academically, and I now have a greater understanding of what I want to study in the future and where I fit into the field of paleoanthropology."
 
-April Tolley, Kennesaw State University (2013)

 

 

 

Student Fees

Early Enrollment Begins November 15 - Full payment must be received by April 1  
(Full Payment = Deposit + Tuition)
 Payment by Cashier or Personal Check Payment by Credit Card/Debit Card
Deposit:500 USD Deposit: 510 USD 
Tuition: 6,365 USD Tuition: 6,455 USD 
TOTAL:6,865 USDTOTAL:6,965 USD


Late Enrollment Begins April 2 - Full payment must be received 10 days prior to course start date
(Full Payment = Deposit + Tuition)
 Payment by Cashier or Personal Check Payment by Credit Card/Debit Card
Deposit:500 USD Deposit: 510 USD 
Tuition: 6,465 USD Tuition: 6,555 USD 
TOTAL:6,965 USDTOTAL:7,065 USD

Accommodations

Students will camp at the historical field compound built by Mary Leakey on the rim of the gorge, at walking distance from many of the sites in Olduvai Gorge.  This is a rustic but comfortable camp and students will share facilities with the entire research team. There is no running water at camp so students are encouraged to bring solar shower bags for personal use. Limited power is available for charging electronic devices, such as flashlights, phones, and computers. There are separate outhouse facilities for men and women that are cleaned daily by the project’s support staff.

MEALS:  All meals will be communal events and will provide plenty of nutritious but basic food in the tradition of local cousin.  Specialized diets (vegan, kosher, etc.) are difficult to maintain in this remote location. Vegetarian may attend but will find options fairly limited.